5 SECRETS TO MIXING TIMBERS LIKE A PRO

Against the grain.

Creating warmth, texture and connecting your interior to nature, timber is one of the great decorating tools, and there’s not a home in existence that doesn’t become instantly more inviting with a touch of this versatile resource. And guess what? There’s no such thing as too much – if you know how to mix different timbers, that is. If you’re smitten with timber but don’t fancy the dated ski-lodge vibe, read on to learn how to avoid a matchy-matchy mess as we reveal the secrets to effortlessly mixing different timbers in your home.

Mixing Timber

1. Take cues from what’s already there.

First you need a clear idea of your colour palette, and a timber floor, if you have one, is a great place to start. But don’t forget to take cues from smaller existing timber details as well, such as windowsills, architraves, cabinetry, doors, banisters and stair risers.

2. Don’t muddle up the undertone.

This refers to whether the timber has warm (yellow/orange) or cool (blue/black) undertones. Once you identify the undertone you can then choose different timbers in the same family to create the perfect mismatched look.

3. Emphasise contrast.

If in doubt, just remember that light and dark always work well together – assuming you’ve stuck to rule number two that is. A lime-washed floor with ebony furniture works for precisely the same reason that black and white is a fail-safe combination.

4. Stick to two or three colours.

It’s best not to get carried away with too many different timbers or your room may start to look confusing. Keep it simple with one primary timber and an accent timber. If you introduce any more than this, make sure it’s only in small doses so that it quietly complements, rather than competes.

5. Pay attention to texture.

Texture is a powerful way to differentiate between timbers that are close in colour. Experiment with knotted pine, distressed timber, a slab with a live edge, or intricate parquetry and panelling when it comes to layering different shapes and textures. If your floor has wide timber planks, try slim, sinewy dining chairs in a lighter or darker colour, for example.

Mixing Timber


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